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Proceedings Paper

Retinal, functional, and morphological comparisons of two different macaque species, Macaca mulatta and Macaca fasicularis, for models of laser eye injury
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Paper Abstract

The past several years has seen a severe shortage of pathogen-free Indian origin rhesus macaques due to the increased requirement for this model in retroviral research. With greater than 30 years of research data accumulated using the Rhesus macaque as the model for laser eye injury there exists a need to bridge to a more readily available nonhuman primate model. Much of the data previously collected from the Rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) provided the basis for the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standards for laser safety. Currently a Tri-service effort is underway to utilize the Cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fasicularis) as a replacement for the Rhesus macaque. Preliminary functional and morphological baseline data collected from multifocal electroretinography (mfERG), optical coherence tomography (OCT) and retinal cell counts were compared from a small group of monkeys and tissues to determine if significant differences existed between the species. Initial functional findings rom mfERG yielded only one difference for the n2 amplitude value which was greater in the Cynomolgus monkey. No significant differences were seen in retinal and foveal thickness, as determined by OCT scans and no significant differences were seen in ganglion cell and inner nuclear cell nuclei counts. A highly significant difference was seen in the numbers of photoreceptor nuclei with greater numbers in the Rhesus macaque. This indicates more studies should be performed to determine the impact that a model change would have on the laser bioeffects community and their ability to continue to provide minimal visible lesion data for laser safety standards. The continued goal of this project will be to provide that necessary baseline information for a seamless transition to a more readily available animal model.

Paper Details

Date Published: 25 April 2005
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 5686, Photonic Therapeutics and Diagnostics, (25 April 2005); doi: 10.1117/12.593668
Show Author Affiliations
Cheryl Dawn DiCarlo, U.S. Army Medical Research Detachment/Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (United States)
Henry D. Hacker, U.S. Army Medical Research Detachment/Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (United States)
Araceli Brown, U.S. Army Medical Research Detachment/Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (United States)
Rachael Cheramie, U.S. Army Medical Research Detachment/Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (United States)
Gary L. Martinsen, Air Force Research Lab. (United States)
Benjamin Rockwell, Air Force Research Lab. (United States)
Bruce E. Stuck, U.S. Army Medical Research Detachment/Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 5686:
Photonic Therapeutics and Diagnostics
Brian Jet-Fei Wong; Eugene A. Trowers; Kenton W. Gregory; Abraham Katzir; Nikiforos Kollias; Reza S. Malek; Henry Hirschberg; Kenneth Eugene Bartels; Steen J. Madsen; Lloyd P. Tate; Lawrence S. Bass; Werner T. W. de Riese; Karen M. McNally-Heintzelman, Editor(s)

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