Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Hover...
Author(s): Martina Mrongovius; Philip Wilksch
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00

Paper Abstract

Working with the geometry and form of light Martina Mrongovius is a holographic artist and physicist. Martina’s holographics capture a strange beauty through layers of aesthetic. This paper is based on her Honours thesis in Applied Physics. The exhibition Hover consisted of seven different holographic scanning and projection geometries. These devices used a range of mechanics to scan holograms through laser beams and laser beams through holographic arrays. The recorded holograms as well as the contraptions by which they are replayed captured the form and flight of a reconstructed dragonfly. In designing the holographic displays safety was an important consideration. The projection devices were also constructed to accommodate a range of laser sources and be easily adjusted to project dragonflies with wingspans from 30 to 2000 mm. Hover was the installation of these stochastic contraptions into a surreal optical habitat of animated projections. Being part of the 2004 Next Wave Festival for the arts Hover attracted a large and diverse audience. The intent of the exhibition was to engage with this audience on many levels while illustrating the nature of holographic recordings. The results of this investigation into the geometry and dynamics of projection are presented along with the design considerations, construction methods and audience response.

Paper Details

Date Published: 21 April 2005
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 5742, Practical Holography XIX: Materials and Applications, (21 April 2005); doi: 10.1117/12.593653
Show Author Affiliations
Martina Mrongovius, RMIT Univ. (Australia)
Philip Wilksch, RMIT Univ. (Australia)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 5742:
Practical Holography XIX: Materials and Applications
Tung H. Jeong; Hans I. Bjelkhagen, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top