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Proceedings Paper

Teleradiology and screening mammography: a telemammography system evaluation and comparison to clinical results
Author(s): Joseph Ken Leader; Denise Chough; Ronald J. Clearfield; Marie A. Ganott; Christiane Hakim; Lara Hardesty; Betty Shindel; Jules H. Sumkin; John M. Drescher; Glenn S. Maitz; David Gur
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Paper Abstract

Radiologists' performance reviewing and rating breast cancer screening mammography exams using a telemammography system was evaluated and compared with the actual clinical interpretations of the same interpretations. Mammography technologists from three remote imaging sites transmitted 245 exams to a central site (radiologists), which they (the technologists) believed needed additional procedures (termed "recall"). Current exam image data and non-image data (i.e., technologist's text message, technologist's graphic marks, patient's prior report, and Computer Aided Detection (CAD) results) were transmitted to the central site and displayed on three high-resolution, portrait monitors. Seven radiologists interpreted ("recall" or "no recall") the exams using the telemammography workstation in three separate multi-mode studies. The mean telemammography recall rates ranged from 72.3% to 82.5% while the actual clinical recall rates ranged from 38.4% to 42.3% across the three studies. Mean Kappa of agreement ranged from 0.102 to 0.213 and mean percent agreement ranged from 48.7% to 57.4% across the three studies. Eighty-seven percent of the disagreement interpretations occurred when the telemammography interpretation resulted in a recommendation to recall and the clinical interpretation resulted in a recommendation not to recall. The poor agreement between the telemammography and clinical interpretations may indicate a critical dependence on images from prior screening exams rather than any text based information. The technologists were sensitive, if not specific, to the mammography features and changes that may lead to recall. Using the telemammography system the radiologists were able to reduce the recommended recalls by the technologist by approximately 25 percent.

Paper Details

Date Published: 6 April 2005
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 5749, Medical Imaging 2005: Image Perception, Observer Performance, and Technology Assessment, (6 April 2005); doi: 10.1117/12.592823
Show Author Affiliations
Joseph Ken Leader, Univ. of Pittsburgh (United States)
Denise Chough, Univ. of Pittsburgh (United States)
Magee-Womens Hospital (United States)
Ronald J. Clearfield, Univ. of Pittsburgh (United States)
Magee-Womens Hospital (United States)
Marie A. Ganott, Univ. of Pittsburgh (United States)
Magee-Womens Hospital (United States)
Christiane Hakim, Univ. of Pittsburgh (United States)
Magee-Womens Hospital (United States)
Lara Hardesty, Univ. of Pittsburgh (United States)
Magee-Womens Hospital (United States)
Betty Shindel, Univ. of Pittsburgh (United States)
Magee-Womens Hospital (United States)
Jules H. Sumkin, Univ. of Pittsburgh (United States)
Magee-Womens Hospital (United States)
John M. Drescher, Univ. of Pittsburgh (United States)
Glenn S. Maitz, Univ. of Pittsburgh (United States)
David Gur, Univ. of Pittsburgh (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 5749:
Medical Imaging 2005: Image Perception, Observer Performance, and Technology Assessment
Miguel P. Eckstein; Yulei Jiang, Editor(s)

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