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Proceedings Paper

Air-cooled mode-locked laser for production of green, ultraviolet, and broadband light
Author(s): Lawrence E. Myers; Loren Eyres; Thomas J. Kane; Greg Keaton; Yidong Zhou; Manuel Martinez; Joe Alonis; John Black
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Paper Abstract

We describe a passively mode-locked, diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser that is used for frequency-conversion applications. The laser is based on a Direct-coupled Pump gain element and saturable Bragg reflector. The laser produces a 20-ps pulse with a 100-MHz repetition rate in a compact commercial package. It has typically <0.2% amplitude noise and diffraction-limited output beam. The average power is typically 7-8 W, and peak power is 4 kW which makes it well-suited for efficient frequency conversion. Using 2 stages of LBO for cascaded second-harmonic and sum-frequency generation, we have obtained >1 W at 355 nm. In addition, we have generated super-continuum output in the visible and infrared from micro-structured nonlinear fiber with pumping both at 1064 nm and 532 nm. Current applications for this laser, primarily in the ultraviolet, include flow cytometry, stereolithography, and semiconductor inspection.

Paper Details

Date Published: 27 April 2005
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 5707, Solid State Lasers XIV: Technology and Devices, (27 April 2005); doi: 10.1117/12.589488
Show Author Affiliations
Lawrence E. Myers, Lightwave Electronics Corp. (United States)
Loren Eyres, Lightwave Electronics Corp. (United States)
Thomas J. Kane, Lightwave Electronics Corp. (United States)
Greg Keaton, Lightwave Electronics Corp. (United States)
Yidong Zhou, Lightwave Electronics Corp. (United States)
Manuel Martinez, Lightwave Electronics Corp. (United States)
Joe Alonis, Lightwave Electronics Corp. (United States)
John Black, Lightwave Electronics Corp. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 5707:
Solid State Lasers XIV: Technology and Devices
Hanna J. Hoffman; Ramesh K. Shori, Editor(s)

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