Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Stereoscopy application of spherical imaging
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00

Paper Abstract

Spherical images are linear images, which are exact in central projection. They are explicitly determined by the projection centre. The technical approach consists of collecting scenery through a single perspective and combining the images like panoramic mosaics. A general application of spherical imaging is hempispehric visualisation of space. In hemispheric visualisation, we distinguish between horizontal, half hemispheric, and full hemispheric imaging. The photogrammetric applications of spherical imaging aim at acquisition of 3D environmental or terrain models. Then the base to distance ratio is typically large. We assume, that the primary advantage of spherical imaging will be nevertheless on stereoscopy applications. We aim at full-scale stereoscopy with projection of spherical images in scale of 1:1. In case of full-scale stereoscopy, the stereoscopic plasticity will have a value of 1 and the base is typically short. Natural viewing would equal to base lengths of human eyes, i.e. to 65 mm. We present in the paper the Stereodrome, which is a physical realisation of full-scale stereo viewing. It consists of a photogrammetric workstation, a high-resolution stereo projector, necessary stereo eye-ware, and a back projection screen. Originally we have motivated us for building the Stereodrome by the fact that it is the only means to really see the behaviour of 3D point clouds in details. In the paper we will also discuss, in which way full-scale stereo display has been used for validating the quality of existing 3D geoinformation.

Paper Details

Date Published: 17 January 2005
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 5665, Videometrics VIII, 56650A (17 January 2005); doi: 10.1117/12.586476
Show Author Affiliations
Henrik G. A. Haggren, Helsinki Univ. of Technology (Finland)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 5665:
Videometrics VIII
J.-Angelo Beraldin; Sabry F. El-Hakim; Armin Gruen; James S. Walton, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top