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Proceedings Paper

Stoichiometric changes to KH2PO4 during laser-induced breakdown
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Paper Abstract

The local structure of KH2PO4 crystals (so-called KDP) at laser-induced damage sites created by irradiation with ~3-ns, 355-nm laser pulses is studied by a combination of Raman scattering and photoluminescence spectroscopies. We compare spectra from pristine material, surface and bulk laser-induced damage sites, as well as from KPO3 references. Results show that irradiation with fluences above the laser-induced breakdown threshold leads to stoichiometric changes at surface damage sites but not at bulk damage sites. New spectroscopic features are attributed to dehydration products. For the laser irradiation conditions used in this study, the decomposed near-surface layer absorbs photons at ~3.4 eV (364 nm). These results may help explain the recently reported observation that surface laser damage sites in KDP crystals tend to grow with subsequent exposure to high-power laser pulses, while bulk damage sites do not.

Paper Details

Date Published: 21 February 2005
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 5647, Laser-Induced Damage in Optical Materials: 2004, (21 February 2005); doi: 10.1117/12.584943
Show Author Affiliations
Raluca A. Negres, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
Sergei O. Kucheyev, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
Paul P. DeMange, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
Univ. of California at Davis (United States)
Christopher Wren Carr, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
Stavros G. Demos, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 5647:
Laser-Induced Damage in Optical Materials: 2004
Gregory J. Exarhos; Arthur H. Guenther; Norbert Kaiser; Keith L. Lewis; M. J. Soileau; Christopher J. Stolz, Editor(s)

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