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Proceedings Paper

Double-pass measurement of human eye aberrations: limitations and practical realization
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Paper Abstract

The problem of correct eye aberrations measurement is very important with the rising widespread of a surgical procedure for reducing refractive error in the eye, so called, LASIK (laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis). The double-pass technique commonly used for measuring aberrations of a human eye involves some uncertainties. One of them is loosing the information about odd human eye aberrations. We report about investigations of the applicability limit of the double-pass measurements depending upon the aberrations status introduced by human eye and actual size of the entrance pupil. We evaluate the double-pass effects for various aberrations and different pupil diameters. It is shown that for small pupils the double-pass effects are negligible. The testing and alignment of aberrometer was performed using the schematic eye, developed in our lab. We also introduced a model of human eye based on bimorph flexible mirror. We perform calculations to demonstrate that our schematic eye is capable of reproducing spatial-temporal statistics of aberrations of living eye with normal vision or even myopic or hypermetropic or with high aberrations ones.

Paper Details

Date Published: 11 November 2004
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 5572, Optics in Atmospheric Propagation and Adaptive Systems VII, (11 November 2004); doi: 10.1117/12.568282
Show Author Affiliations
Renat R. Letfullin, Moscow Lomonosov State Univ. (Russia)
Alexey I. Belyakov, Institute of Laser Information Technologies (Russia)
Tatyana Yu Cherezova, Moscow Lomonosov State Univ. (Russia)
Alexis V. Kudryashov, Institute of Laser Information Technologies (Russia)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 5572:
Optics in Atmospheric Propagation and Adaptive Systems VII
John D. Gonglewski; Karin Stein, Editor(s)

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