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Proceedings Paper

Angular and azimuthal distribution of side-scattered light from fiber Bragg gratings
Author(s): Libor Kotacka; Jessica Chauve; Raman Kashyap
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Paper Abstract

We theoretically and experimentally study the polarization properties and the spatial and wavelength dependence of side scattered radiation from a fibre Bragg grating (FBG). Antenna theory is used to model the radiation pattern from the FBG. Recently, it was reported by other authors that side scattered light from a fibre Bragg grating exhibits a remarkable anisotropy in its azimuthal distribution, proposed to be due to an inhomogeneous transverse grating profile. We show that the angular distribution of the scattered light depends on the actual phase-matching angle - thus the observation angle - and if any, on the grating tilt. Hence, inhomogeneities in the cross-section of the fibre grating are not necessarily responsible for the anisotropic light distribution as was reported. It is shown that the scattered light pattern from any grating (even a uniform un-tilted one) possesses a non-uniform intensity distribution. The spatial distribution of the scattered light is then treated as the Fraunhofer diffraction pattern. In an analogy to dipole radiation, the presented model explicitly shows that the scattered light is located in specifically defined regions of a cone depending on the principal parameters of the FBG. The technique has interesting implications for several optical fibre Bragg grating devices.

Paper Details

Date Published: 20 December 2004
PDF: 11 pages
Proc. SPIE 5577, Photonics North 2004: Optical Components and Devices, (20 December 2004); doi: 10.1117/12.567565
Show Author Affiliations
Libor Kotacka, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal (Canada)
Jessica Chauve, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal (Canada)
Raman Kashyap, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal (Canada)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 5577:
Photonics North 2004: Optical Components and Devices

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