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Proceedings Paper

Status of Aqua MODIS on-orbit calibration and characterization
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Paper Abstract

The MODIS Flight Model 1 (FM1) has been in operation for more than two years since its launch onboard the NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) Aqua spacecraft on May 4, 2002. The MODIS has 36 spectral bands: 20 reflective solar bands (RSB) with center wavelengths from 0.41 to 2.2mm and 16 thermal emissive bands (TEB) from 3.7 to 14.5mm. It provides the science community observations (data products) of the Earth's land, oceans, and atmosphere for a board range of applications. Its primary on-orbit calibration and characterization activities are performed using a solar diffuser (SD) and a solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM) system for the RSB and a blackbody for the TEB. Another on-board calibrator (OBC) known as the spectro-radiometric calibration assembly (SRCA) is used for the instrument's spatial (TEB and RSB) and spectral (RSB only) characterization. We present in this paper the status of Aqua MODIS calibration and characterization during its first two years of on-orbit operation. Discussions will be focused on the calibration activities executed on-orbit in order to maintain and enhance the instrument's performance and the quality of its Level 1B (L1B) data products. We also provide comparisons between Aqua MODIS and Terra MODIS (launched in December, 1999), including their similarity and difference in response trending and optics degradation. Existing data and results show that Aqua MODIS bands 8 (0.412mm) and 9 (0.443mm) have much smaller degradation than Terra MODIS bands 8 and 9. The most noticeable feature shown in the RSB trending is that the mirror side differences in Aqua MODIS are extremely small and stable (<0.1%) while the Terra MODIS RSB trending has shown significant mirror side difference and wavelength dependent degradation. The overall stability of the Aqua MODIS TEB is also better than that of the Terra MODIS during their first two years of on-orbit operation.

Paper Details

Date Published: 4 November 2004
PDF: 11 pages
Proc. SPIE 5570, Sensors, Systems, and Next-Generation Satellites VIII, (4 November 2004); doi: 10.1117/12.564940
Show Author Affiliations
Xiaoxiong Xiong, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
William L. Barnes, Univ. of Maryland/Baltimore County (United States)
Kwofu Chiang, Science Systems and Applications, Inc. (United States)
Hector Erives, Science Systems and Applications, Inc. (United States)
Nianzeng Che, Science Systems and Applications, Inc. (United States)
Junqiang Sun, Science Systems and Applications, Inc. (United States)
Alice T. Isaacman, Science Applications International Corp. (United States)
Vincent V. Salomonson, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 5570:
Sensors, Systems, and Next-Generation Satellites VIII
Roland Meynart; Steven P. Neeck; Haruhisa Shimoda, Editor(s)

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