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Proceedings Paper

The Space Metrology Program
Author(s): David B. Pollock; Alexander Panfilov; Inessa Glazkova; Thomas W. Humpherys; Victor Privalsky; Victor I. Sapritsky; Svetlana P. Morozova; Boris Khlevnoy; Raju U. Datla; Victor Misnik; Valery M. Sinelschikov
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Paper Abstract

The full potential of current remote sensor technology is limited by the inability to correct biases once an exo-atmospheric remote sensor becomes operational. Even when the calibration is traced to the International System of Units, SI, and the instrument is performing within the operational envelope wherein it is calibrated, the problem exists and a Space Metrology Program is a potential solution to the problem. This paper discusses such a program, suggests a feasibility study to address the issues and recommends a plan of action. Any operational instrument has a bias and reducing the magnitude of the bias can only be accomplished when an adequately accurate standard is accessible by the instrument while the instrument is in its operational environment. Currently the radiometric flux from the sun, the moon and the stars is inadequately accurate SI to provide a standard that is consistent with the remote sensor state-of-the-art technology. The result is data that is less accurate than it could be often leading to confusing and conflicting conclusions drawn from that data. Planned remote sensors such as those required to meet future program needs (e.g. the United States National Polar-Orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) and the proposed international Global Earth Observation Program) are going to need the higher accuracy radiometric standards to maintain their accuracy once they become operational. To resolve the problem, a set of standard radiometers on the International Space Station is suggested against which other exo-atmospheric radiometric instruments can be calibrated. A feasibility study for this program is planned.

Paper Details

Date Published: 4 November 2004
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 5570, Sensors, Systems, and Next-Generation Satellites VIII, (4 November 2004); doi: 10.1117/12.564334
Show Author Affiliations
David B. Pollock, Univ. of Alabama in Huntsville (United States)
Alexander Panfilov, M. V. Khrunichev State Space Research and Production Ctr. (Russia)
Inessa Glazkova, M. V. Khrunichev State Space Research and Production Ctr. (Russia)
Thomas W. Humpherys, Utah State Univ. (United States)
Victor Privalsky, Utah State Univ. (United States)
Victor I. Sapritsky, All-Russian Institute for Optophysical Measurements (Russia)
Svetlana P. Morozova, All-Russian Institute for Optophysical Measurements (Russia)
Boris Khlevnoy, All-Russian Institute for Optophysical Measurements (Russia)
Raju U. Datla, National Institute of Standards and Technology (United States)
Victor Misnik, Central Science and Production Association Kometa (Russia)
Valery M. Sinelschikov, Central Science and Production Association Kometa (Russia)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 5570:
Sensors, Systems, and Next-Generation Satellites VIII
Roland Meynart; Steven P. Neeck; Haruhisa Shimoda, Editor(s)

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