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Proceedings Paper

Cultivated land conversion and bioproductivity in China
Author(s): Jikun Huang; Xiangzheng Deng; Scott Rozelle
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Paper Abstract

International experience shows that rapid economic growth is accompanied by a large shift of agricultural land to other uses. The overall goal of this study is to examine the changes of the area and bioproductivity of cultivated land in China where the size of the economy doubled every 8 years. Based on Landsat TM/ETM digital images covering China’s territory in the past 15 years and by utilizing the AEZ methodology, our study finds that contrary to many people’s expectations, China recorded a net increase of cultivated land by 2.65 million hectares in 1986-2000 and accounted for nearly 2% of all cultivated land. We also found that the average productivity of cultivated land declined by about 0.31%, as the bioproductivity of new cultivated land converted from other uses was generally lower than that of cultivated land converted to other uses. Despite a decline in land bioproductivity in the past and a likely decline in total cultivated land in the future, their impact on agricultural production will be minimal. China can maintain a healthy cultivated land base for food and agricultural production in the long term.

Paper Details

Date Published: 9 November 2004
PDF: 14 pages
Proc. SPIE 5544, Remote Sensing and Modeling of Ecosystems for Sustainability, (9 November 2004); doi: 10.1117/12.563268
Show Author Affiliations
Jikun Huang, Ctr. for Chinese Agricultural Policy, CAS (China)
Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research, CAS (China)
Xiangzheng Deng, Ctr. for Chinese Agricultural Policy, CAS (China)
Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research, CAS (China)
Scott Rozelle, Univ. of California/Davis (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 5544:
Remote Sensing and Modeling of Ecosystems for Sustainability
Wei Gao; David R. Shaw, Editor(s)

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