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Proceedings Paper

Investigations of laser percussion drilling of small holes on thin sheet metals
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Paper Abstract

Laser drilling is increasingly being used in fabrication of small components for electronics, aerospace, biomedical, and MEMS applications because it provides rapid, precise, clean, flexible, and efficient process. For laser percussion drilling, the workpiece is subjected to a series of laser pulses at the same spot at a specified laser parameter setting. Large temperature gradient is introduced, which results in a minimal heat affected zone (HAZ) and low heat distortion. In laser percussion drilling of small holes, profile of the HAZ and the geometry of the holes strongly depend on settings of the laser parameters such as peak power, pulse length, pulse repetition rate, focal condition, number of pulses, etc. In addition, the processing results are strongly influenced by geometrical and material properties of the workpiece. This paper presents a study of laser process for percussion drilling of micrometer size holes on thin sheet metals using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. Experimental investigations are performed to characterize the geometry of the hole and surface topography in their vicinity. Analytical and computational modeling of the temperature distribution is also performed and used to determine profiles of the HAZs. The effects of different combinations of laser parameters and workpiece properties on the hole geometry are summarized and a procedure for laser percussion drilling of small holes on sheet metals is outlined.

Paper Details

Date Published: 29 September 2004
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 5525, Laser Beam Shaping V, (29 September 2004); doi: 10.1117/12.560253
Show Author Affiliations
Wei Han, Worcester Polytechnic Institute (United States)
Ryszard J. Pryputniewicz, Worcester Polytechnic Institute (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 5525:
Laser Beam Shaping V
Fred M. Dickey; David L. Shealy, Editor(s)

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