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Proceedings Paper

Soil erosion effects on soil organic carbon and an assessment within China
Author(s): Yunfeng Hu; Jiyuan Liu; Dafang Zhuang; Shaoqiang Wang; Fengting Yang; Siqing Chen
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Paper Abstract

Soil erosion is a widespread geological process with strong capabilities to entrap, transport, and redistribute surface soil. It is important to grade erosion intensity and estimate eroded soil mass. On the other hand, soil organic carbon pool (SOC), as the largest terrestrial carbon content, is prone to be affected by soil erosion. Soil erosion redistributes surface soil over landscape, and changes the physical environmental conditions. The consequences are depletion of SOC in eroded regions, emission of carbon dioxide during transportation and input of extra SOC in deposited sites. This paper quantified the effects of soil erosion on soil organic carbon through following three steps: firstly, soil erosion type and soil erosion intensity was determined by interpreting Landsat TM images. Secondly, through field investigation, soil type and soil profile data were collected, and SOC contents in the 0-20cm layers were constructed. Finally, supported by map algebra in Geographic Information System (GIS), soil organic carbon loss induced by soil erosion was calculated based on the national soil erosion modulus standard. Total annual SOC loss in China was about 1.595×108 ton−C yr−1. Assuming 20% of SOC was oxidized, erosion induced CO2 emission was about 3.19×107 ton−Cyr−1.

Paper Details

Date Published: 9 November 2004
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 5544, Remote Sensing and Modeling of Ecosystems for Sustainability, (9 November 2004); doi: 10.1117/12.558631
Show Author Affiliations
Yunfeng Hu, Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research, CAS (China)
Graduate School of the CAS (China)
Jiyuan Liu, Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research, CAS (China)
Dafang Zhuang, Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research, CAS (China)
Shaoqiang Wang, Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research, CAS (China)
Fengting Yang, Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research, CAS (China)
Graduate School of the CAS (China)
Siqing Chen, Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research, CAS (China)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 5544:
Remote Sensing and Modeling of Ecosystems for Sustainability
Wei Gao; David R. Shaw, Editor(s)

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