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Proceedings Paper

First-generation instruments for the Magellan telescopes: characteristics, operation, and performance
Author(s): David J. Osip; Mark M. Phillips; Rebecca Bernstein; Greg Burley; Alan Dressler; James L. Elliot; Eric Persson; Stephen A. Shectman; Ian Thompson
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Paper Abstract

The Magellan Telescopes are a collaboration between the Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington (OCIW), University of Arizona, Harvard University, University of Michigan, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) consisting of two 6.5 meter telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, in the Chilean Andes. The Walter Baade telescope achieved first light in September 2000 and the Landon Clay telescope started science operations in September 2002. In addition to two modified spectroscopic instruments, the Boller and Chivens Spectrograph and the Low Dispersion Survey Spectrograph (LDSS-2), four first generation instruments are now deployed at the Magellan Telescopes. Here we briefly describe the operations and performance of MagIC - a direct imaging CCD camera, MIKE - a double echelle spectrograph, PANIC - a near-IR imager, and IMACS - a multi-purpose, multi-object imaging spectrograph.

Paper Details

Date Published: 30 September 2004
PDF: 11 pages
Proc. SPIE 5492, Ground-based Instrumentation for Astronomy, (30 September 2004); doi: 10.1117/12.552414
Show Author Affiliations
David J. Osip, Las Campanas Observatory (Chile)
Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington (United States)
Mark M. Phillips, Las Campanas Observatory (Chile)
Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington (United States)
Rebecca Bernstein, Univ. of Michigan (United States)
Greg Burley, Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington (United States)
Alan Dressler, Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington (United States)
James L. Elliot, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
Eric Persson, Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington (United States)
Stephen A. Shectman, Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington (United States)
Ian Thompson, Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 5492:
Ground-based Instrumentation for Astronomy
Alan F. M. Moorwood; Masanori Iye, Editor(s)

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