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Proceedings Paper

Hard x-ray polarimeter for small satellite: design, feasibility study, and ground experiments
Author(s): Kiyoshi Hayashida; Tatehiro Mihara; Syuichi Gunji; Fuyuki Tokanai
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Paper Abstract

We make a plan of a hard X-ray polarimetry experiment with a small satellite. Bright point-like sources in 20-80keV are prime targets, for which we will not use focusing optics. Comparing various types of polarimeters, we adopt a scattering type in which anisotropy in scattering directions of photons is employed. After optimization of the design is considered with simplified models of scattering polarimeters, we propose to use segmented scatter targets made of plastic scintillators, with which scattering location is identified by detecting recoiled electrons. Simulations show that recoiled electrons are detectable when incident X-ray energies are above 40keV, for which higher polarimetry sensitivity is obtained. We confirmed the performance of such a polarimeter in experiments at a Synchrotron facility and performed a balloon flight in which a proto type unit of the polarimeter was onboard. We finally discuss feasibility of a small satellite experiment in which many of the polarimeter units will be employed. Twenty five units of the polarimeter enable us to detect hard X-ray polarization of 5-10% for a hundred mCrab sources. Improvement in the sensitivity to detect recoiled electrons will significantly improve the polarimetry sensitivity. We also consider a low energy extension of our system down to below 10keV in order to cover wide energy range.

Paper Details

Date Published: 29 September 2004
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 5501, High-Energy Detectors in Astronomy, (29 September 2004); doi: 10.1117/12.552159
Show Author Affiliations
Kiyoshi Hayashida, Osaka Univ. (Japan)
Tatehiro Mihara, RIKEN--The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (Japan)
Syuichi Gunji, Yamagata Univ. (Japan)
Fuyuki Tokanai, Yamagata Univ. (Japan)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 5501:
High-Energy Detectors in Astronomy
Andrew D. Holland, Editor(s)

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