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Proceedings Paper

The VISTA IR camera
Author(s): Gavin B. Dalton; Martin Caldwell; Kim Ward; Martin S. Whalley; Kevin Burke; John M. Lucas; Tony Richards; Marc Ferlet; Ruben L. Edeson; Daniel Tye; Bryan M. Shaughnessy; Mel Strachan; Eli Atad-Ettedgui; Melanie R. Leclerc; Angus Gallie; Nagaraja N. Bezawada; Paul Clark; Nirmal Bissonauth; Peter Luke; Nigel A. Dipper; Paul Berry; Will Sutherland; Jim Emerson
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Paper Abstract

The VISTA IR Camera has now completed its detailed design phase and is on schedule for delivery to ESO’s Cerro Paranal Observatory in 2006. The camera consists of 16 Raytheon VIRGO 2048x2048 HgCdTe arrays in a sparse focal plane sampling a 1.65 degree field of view. A 1.4m diameter filter wheel provides slots for 7 distinct science filters, each comprising 16 individual filter panes. The camera also provides autoguiding and curvature sensing information for the VISTA telescope, and relies on tight tolerancing to meet the demanding requirements of the f/1 telescope design. The VISTA IR camera is unusual in that it contains no cold pupil-stop, but rather relies on a series of nested cold baffles to constrain the light reaching the focal plane to the science beam. In this paper we present a complete overview of the status of the final IR Camera design, its interaction with the VISTA telescope, and a summary of the predicted performance of the system.

Paper Details

Date Published: 30 September 2004
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 5492, Ground-based Instrumentation for Astronomy, (30 September 2004); doi: 10.1117/12.551378
Show Author Affiliations
Gavin B. Dalton, Rutherford Appleton Lab. (United Kingdom)
Martin Caldwell, Rutherford Appleton Lab. (United Kingdom)
Kim Ward, Rutherford Appleton Lab. (United Kingdom)
Martin S. Whalley, Rutherford Appleton Lab. (United Kingdom)
Kevin Burke, Rutherford Appleton Lab. (United Kingdom)
John M. Lucas, Rutherford Appleton Lab. (United Kingdom)
Tony Richards, Rutherford Appleton Lab. (United Kingdom)
Marc Ferlet, Rutherford Appleton Lab. (United Kingdom)
Ruben L. Edeson, Rutherford Appleton Lab. (United Kingdom)
Daniel Tye, Rutherford Appleton Lab. (United Kingdom)
Bryan M. Shaughnessy, Rutherford Appleton Lab. (United Kingdom)
Mel Strachan, UK Astronomy Technology Ctr. (United Kingdom)
Eli Atad-Ettedgui, UK Astronomy Technology Ctr. (United Kingdom)
Melanie R. Leclerc, UK Astronomy Technology Ctr. (United Kingdom)
Angus Gallie, UK Astronomy Technology Ctr. (United Kingdom)
Nagaraja N. Bezawada, UK Astronomy Technology Ctr. (United Kingdom)
Paul Clark, Univ. of Durham (United Kingdom)
Nirmal Bissonauth, Univ. of Durham (United Kingdom)
Peter Luke, Univ. of Durham (United Kingdom)
Nigel A. Dipper, Univ. of Durham (United Kingdom)
Paul Berry, Univ. of Durham (United Kingdom)
Will Sutherland, Institute of Astronomy/Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom)
Jim Emerson, Queen Mary Univ. of London (United Kingdom)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 5492:
Ground-based Instrumentation for Astronomy
Alan F. M. Moorwood; Masanori Iye, Editor(s)

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