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Proceedings Paper

Deep lithography with protons as an alternative fabrication technology for high-precision 2D fiber connector components
Author(s): Bart Volckaerts; Rafal G. Krajewski; Pedro Vynck; Heidi Ottevaere; Jan A. Watte; Daniel Daems; Alex Hermanne; Hugo Thienpont
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Paper Abstract

We present Deep Lithography with Protons (DLP) for the fabrication of ultra-dense fiber coupling elements which consist of circular, conical-shaped alignment features, ordered in a 2D array with high-precision pitches. This technology relies on the irradiation of PMMA-resist layers with a swift proton beam featuring a well-defined circular shape, followed by a selective development of these exposed zones. To increase the coupling efficiency, the DLP-technology allows to integrate uniform spherical micro-lenses, which are created by a controlled swelling of the proton-bombarded domains in a monomer vapor, in front of the micro-alignment holes. We will first discuss our work on the improvement of the DLP irradiation and development process step to enhance the coupling efficiency and the field-installability of the connector components. Furthermore, we will illustrate the optical design of micro-lens arrays and their integration in fiber connectors with improved tolerances.

Paper Details

Date Published: 16 August 2004
PDF: 11 pages
Proc. SPIE 5455, MEMS, MOEMS, and Micromachining, (16 August 2004); doi: 10.1117/12.547719
Show Author Affiliations
Bart Volckaerts, Vrije Univ. Brussel (Belgium)
Rafal G. Krajewski, Vrije Univ. Brussel (Belgium)
Pedro Vynck, Vrije Univ. Brussel (Belgium)
Heidi Ottevaere, Vrije Univ. Brussel (Belgium)
Jan A. Watte, Tyco Electronics Raychem N.V. (Belgium)
Daniel Daems, Tyco Electronics Raychem N.V. (Belgium)
Alex Hermanne, Vrije Univ. Brussel (Belgium)
Hugo Thienpont, Vrije Univ. Brussel (Belgium)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 5455:
MEMS, MOEMS, and Micromachining
Hakan Urey; Ayman El-Fatatry, Editor(s)

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