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Proceedings Paper

External second-gate Fourier transform ion mobility spectrometry: parametric optimization for detection of weapons of mass destruction
Author(s): Edward E. Tarver
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Paper Abstract

Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is recognized as one of the most sensitive and robust techniques for the detection of narcotics, explosives and chemical warfare agents. IMS is widely used in forensic, military and security applications. Increasing threat of terrorist attacks, the proliferation of narcotics, Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) treaty verification as well as humanitarian de-mining efforst have mandated that equal importance be placed on the time required to obtain results as well as the quality of the analytical data. In this regard IMS is virtually unrivaled when both speed of response and sensitivity have to be considered. The problem with conventional (signal averaging) IMS systems is the fixed duty cycle of the entrance gate that restricts to less than 1%, the number of available ions contributing to the measured signal. Furthermore, the signal averaging process incorporates scan-to-scan variations that degrade the spectral resolution contributing to misidentifications and false positives.

Paper Details

Date Published: 15 September 2004
PDF: 14 pages
Proc. SPIE 5403, Sensors, and Command, Control, Communications, and Intelligence (C3I) Technologies for Homeland Security and Homeland Defense III, (15 September 2004); doi: 10.1117/12.546800
Show Author Affiliations
Edward E. Tarver, Sandia National Labs. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 5403:
Sensors, and Command, Control, Communications, and Intelligence (C3I) Technologies for Homeland Security and Homeland Defense III
Edward M. Carapezza, Editor(s)

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