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Proceedings Paper

Embedded MEMS for health monitoring and management of civil infrastructure
Author(s): Mohamed Saafi; Peter Romine
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Paper Abstract

Civil engineering structures are large and their damage mechanism is complex requiring a large number of inexpensive, spatially distributed and wirelessly powered embedded sensing devices that support frequent and on-demand acquisition of real-time information about their state. Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) seem to have the necessary characteristics to meet these requirements. MEMS technology, such as, sensors, actuators and other engineered components can be embedded into concrete structures to provide sensing and interaction capabilities. By embedding active electronics with MEMS, the ability of the concrete structure to interpret its environment is improved. However, many challenges must be met in order to develop a mature MEMS technology for structural health monitoring (SHM). These challenges are primarily technical in nature and need to be addressed before this emerging technology can be implemented in different civil engineering structures. The objective of this paper is to study the feasibility of embedding MEMS devices into concrete material for conditioning and health monitoring of civil infrastructure. A research program was conducted to evaluate the durability and sensing capability of different embedded MEMS devices, and the findings are presented here.

Paper Details

Date Published: 29 July 2004
PDF: 13 pages
Proc. SPIE 5391, Smart Structures and Materials 2004: Sensors and Smart Structures Technologies for Civil, Mechanical, and Aerospace Systems, (29 July 2004); doi: 10.1117/12.543590
Show Author Affiliations
Mohamed Saafi, Alabama A&M Univ. (United States)
Peter Romine, Alabama A&M Univ. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 5391:
Smart Structures and Materials 2004: Sensors and Smart Structures Technologies for Civil, Mechanical, and Aerospace Systems
Shih-Chi Liu, Editor(s)

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