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Proceedings Paper

Cubic-zirconia-based fiber optic pressure sensor for high-temperature environment
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Paper Abstract

Pressure measurement in ultra high temperature is very important in a wide array of industries. Optical fiber-based sensing instrumentation is particularly attractive for the measurement of a wide variety of physical and chemical parameters due to their inherent characteristic. Conventional quartz glass fiber-optic sensors show excellent performance in pressure measurement, applications, but they cannot be used for contact measurement at temperatures above 800 °C. Single-crystal sapphire has been extensively used for high temperature measurement over 1000 °C, but very little data was reported for pressure measurement. In order to extend the operating temperature of fiber-optic pressure sensors, a fiber optic pressure sensor utilizing single crystal cubic zirconia as a structure material has been developed. The pressure response of the sensor has been measured from 0 to 1700Psi. Additional experimental results from 23 °C to 1026 °C show that cubic zirconia could be used for pressure sensor at temperatures over 1000°C. This study demonstrated the general functionality of the single crystal cubic zirconia sensor for pressure measurement at high temperatures.

Paper Details

Date Published: 8 March 2004
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 5272, Industrial and Highway Sensors Technology, (8 March 2004); doi: 10.1117/12.515124
Show Author Affiliations
Wei Peng, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ. (United States)
Gary R. Pickrell, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ. (United States)
Anbo Wang, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 5272:
Industrial and Highway Sensors Technology
Brian Culshaw; Samuel David Crossley; Helmut E. Knee; Michael A. Marcus; John P. Dakin, Editor(s)

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