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Proceedings Paper

Authentication of digital video evidence
Author(s): Nicholas D. Beser; Thomas E. Duerr; Gregory P. Staisiunas
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Paper Abstract

In response to a requirement from the United States Postal Inspection Service, the Technical Support Working Group tasked The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) to develop a technique tha will ensure the authenticity, or integrity, of digital video (DV). Verifiable integrity is needed if DV evidence is to withstand a challenge to its admissibility in court on the grounds that it can be easily edited. Specifically, the verification technique must detect additions, deletions, or modifications to DV and satisfy the two-part criteria pertaining to scientific evidence as articulated in Daubert et al. v. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals Inc., 43 F3d (9th Circuit, 1995). JHU/APL has developed a prototype digital video authenticator (DVA) that generates digital signatures based on public key cryptography at the frame level of the DV. Signature generation and recording is accomplished at the same time as DV is recorded by the camcorder. Throughput supports the consumer-grade camcorder data rate of 25 Mbps. The DVA software is implemented on a commercial laptop computer, which is connected to a commercial digital camcorder via the IEEE-1394 serial interface. A security token provides agent identification and the interface to the public key infrastructure (PKI) that is needed for management of the public keys central to DV integrity verification.

Paper Details

Date Published: 19 November 2003
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 5203, Applications of Digital Image Processing XXVI, (19 November 2003); doi: 10.1117/12.512555
Show Author Affiliations
Nicholas D. Beser, Johns Hopkins Univ. (United States)
Thomas E. Duerr, Johns Hopkins Univ. (United States)
Gregory P. Staisiunas, U.S. Postal Inspection Service (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 5203:
Applications of Digital Image Processing XXVI
Andrew G. Tescher, Editor(s)

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