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Proceedings Paper

Summary of the Solar Orbiter payload working group activities
Author(s): Bernhard Fleck; Richard A. Harrison; Richard G. Marsden; Robert Wimmer-Schweingruber
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Paper Abstract

Approved in October 2000 by ESA's Science Programme Committee as a flexi-mission, the Solar Orbiter will study the Sun and unexplored regions of the inner heliosphere from a unique orbit that brings the probe to within 45 solar radii (0.21 AU) of our star, and to solar latitudes as high as 38°. The scientific payload to be carried by the Orbiter will include a sophisticated remote-sensing package, as well as state-of-the-art in-situ instruments. Given the technical and financial constraints associated with this mission, it is essential that key technologies requiring significant development be identified as early as possible. ESA has therefore set up a Payload Working Group (PWG), made up of members of the scientific community with expertise in instrumentation of the kind envisaged for the Solar Orbiter. The tasks of the PWGs included: 1) a realistic assessment of the strawman payload, including definition of mass, size, power requirements; 2) identification of key problem areas arising as a result of the extreme thermal and radiation environments; 3) identification of necessary technological developments; and 4) provision of detailed input to a Solar Orbiter Payload Definition Document (PDD). This contribution summarizes the activities and findings by the Solar Orbiter Payload Working Group.

Paper Details

Date Published: 4 February 2004
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 5171, Telescopes and Instrumentation for Solar Astrophysics, (4 February 2004); doi: 10.1117/12.510179
Show Author Affiliations
Bernhard Fleck, European Space Agency/ESTEC (Netherlands)
Richard A. Harrison, Rutherford Appleton Lab. (United Kingdom)
Richard G. Marsden, European Space Agency/ESTEC (Netherlands)
Robert Wimmer-Schweingruber, Univ. Kiel (Germany)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 5171:
Telescopes and Instrumentation for Solar Astrophysics
Silvano Fineschi; Mark A. Gummin, Editor(s)

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