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Proceedings Paper

Cold interferometric nulling demonstration in space (CINDIS)
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Paper Abstract

The Cold Interferometric Nulling Demonstration in Space (CINDIS) is a modest-cost technology demonstration mission, in support of interferometer architectures for Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF). It is designed to provide as complete as possible a demonstration of the key technologies needed for a TPF interferometer at low risk, for a cost less than $300M. CINDIS foregoes scientific objectives at the outset, enabling significant cost savings that allow us to demonstrate important features of a TPF interferometer, such as high-contrast nulling interferometry at 10 μm wavelength, vibration control strategies, instrument pointing and path control, stray light control, and possibly 4-aperture compound nulling. This concept was developed in response to the NASA Extra-Solar Planets Advanced Concepts NRA (NRA-01-OSS-04); this paper presents the results of the first phase of the study.

Paper Details

Date Published: 19 November 2003
PDF: 16 pages
Proc. SPIE 5170, Techniques and Instrumentation for Detection of Exoplanets, (19 November 2003); doi: 10.1117/12.508013
Show Author Affiliations
Martin Charley Noecker, Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. (United States)
Roger Linfield, Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. (United States)
Dan Miller, Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. (United States)
David Osterman, Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. (United States)
Steven Kilston, Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. (United States)
Mike Lieber, Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. (United States)
Bill Babb, Honeywell Space Systems, Inc. (United States)
Andrew Cavender, Honeywell Space Systems, Inc. (United States)
Jack Jacobs, Honeywell Space Systems, Inc. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 5170:
Techniques and Instrumentation for Detection of Exoplanets
Daniel R. Coulter, Editor(s)

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