Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Homeland security: sharing and managing critical incident information
Author(s): W. Ross Ashley
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00

Paper Abstract

Effective critical incident response for homeland security requires access to real-time information from many organizations. Command and control, as well as basic situational awareness, are all dependant on quickly communicating a dynamically changing picture to a variety of decision makers. For the most part, critical information management is not unfamiliar or new to the public safety community. However, new challenges present themselves when that information needs to be seamlessly shared across multiple organizations at the local, state and federal level in real-time. The homeland security problem does not lend itself to the traditional military joint forces planning model where activities shift from a deliberate planning process to a crisis action planning process. Rather, the homeland security problem is more similar to a traditional public safety model where the current activity state moves from complete inactivity or low-level attention to immediate crisis action planning. More often than not the escalation occurs with no warning or baseline information. This paper addresses the challenges of sharing critical incident information and the impacts new technologies will have on this problem. The value of current and proposed approaches will be critiqued for operational value and areas will be identified for further development.

Paper Details

Date Published: 22 September 2003
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 5071, Sensors, and Command, Control, Communications, and Intelligence (C3I) Technologies for Homeland Defense and Law Enforcement II, (22 September 2003); doi: 10.1117/12.502459
Show Author Affiliations
W. Ross Ashley, The Templar Corp. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 5071:
Sensors, and Command, Control, Communications, and Intelligence (C3I) Technologies for Homeland Defense and Law Enforcement II
Edward M. Carapezza, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top