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Proceedings Paper

Atmospheric correction of spectral imagery: evaluation of the FLAASH algorithm with AVIRIS data
Author(s): Michael W. Matthew; Steven M. Adler-Golden; Alexander Berk; Gerald W. Felde; Gail P. Anderson; David Gorodetzky; Scott E. Paswaters; Margaret Shippert
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Paper Abstract

With its combination of good spatial and spectral resolution, visible to near infrared spectral imaging from aircraft or spacecraft is a highly valuable technology for remote sensing of the earth's surface. Typically it is desirable to eliminate atmospheric effects on the imagery, a process known as atmospheric correction. In this paper we review the basic methodology of first-principles atmospheric correction and present results from the latest version of the FLAASH (Fast Line-of-Sight Atmospheric Analysis of Spectral Hypercubes) algorithm. We show some comparisons of ground truth spectra with FLAASH-processed AVIRIS data, including results obtained using different processing options, and with results from the ACORN algorithm that derive from an older MODTRAN4 spectral database.

Paper Details

Date Published: 23 September 2003
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 5093, Algorithms and Technologies for Multispectral, Hyperspectral, and Ultraspectral Imagery IX, (23 September 2003); doi: 10.1117/12.499604
Show Author Affiliations
Michael W. Matthew, Spectral Sciences, Inc. (United States)
Steven M. Adler-Golden, Spectral Sciences, Inc. (United States)
Alexander Berk, Spectral Sciences, Inc. (United States)
Gerald W. Felde, Air Force Research Lab. (United States)
Gail P. Anderson, Air Force Research Lab. (United States)
David Gorodetzky, Research Systems, Inc. (United States)
Scott E. Paswaters, Research Systems, Inc. (United States)
Margaret Shippert, Research Systems, Inc. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 5093:
Algorithms and Technologies for Multispectral, Hyperspectral, and Ultraspectral Imagery IX
Sylvia S. Shen; Paul E. Lewis, Editor(s)

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