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Proceedings Paper

Miniature mass spectrometer for chemical sensing in homeland defense applications
Author(s): Mahadeva P. Sinha; John Houseman
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Paper Abstract

A Miniature Mass Spectrometer (MMS) with an array detector has been developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The spectrometer has a focal plane geometry, and an array detector that can measure the intensities of different masses simultaneously after their separation along the focal plane. In the past, the large mass, size and the lack of an array detector with high gain (such as an electron multiplier) did not allow the application of focal plane mass spectrometer to the measurement that required high sensitivity and portability. In the JPL developed-MMS, miniaturization has been accomplished by using rare earth magnet material and novelties in the design of the magnetic and electric sectors. A new ion detector was developed for the measurement of the intensities of different mass ions. The array detector is based on the conversion sequence of ions into electrons into photons and their final measurement by a photon array detector. MMS possesses high sensitivity, specificity, and fast response time and can be used as a universal chemical analyzer. It will find application in a variety of Home Defense tasks. MMS is presently being applied for the detection of propellants (hydrazine and its derivatives). The instrument will have a mass of 1-2 kg and consume a power of 2-4 W for operation

Paper Details

Date Published: 16 July 2003
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 5048, Nondestructive Detection and Measurement for Homeland Security, (16 July 2003); doi: 10.1117/12.498120
Show Author Affiliations
Mahadeva P. Sinha, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
John Houseman, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 5048:
Nondestructive Detection and Measurement for Homeland Security
Steven R. Doctor; Yoseph Bar-Cohen; A. Emin Aktan, Editor(s)

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