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Proceedings Paper

MPRS (URBOT) commercialization
Author(s): Donny Ciccimaro; William Baker; Ian Hamilton; Leif Heikkila; Joel Renick
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Paper Abstract

The Man Portable Robotic System (MPRS) project objective was to build and deliver hardened robotic systems to the U.S. Army’s 10 Mountain Division in Fort Drum, New York. The system, specifically designed for tunnel and sewer reconnaissance, was equipped with visual and audio sensors that allowed the Army engineers to detect trip wires and booby traps before personnel entered a potentially hostile environment. The MPRS system has shown to be useful in government and military supported field exercises, but the system has yet to reach the hands of civilian users. Potential users in Law Enforcement and Border Patrol have shown a strong interest in the system, but robotic costs were thought to be prohibitive for law enforcement budgets. Through the Center for Commercialization of Advanced Technology (CCAT) program, an attempt will be made to commercialize the MPRS. This included a detailed market analysis performed to verify the market viability of the technologies. Hence, the first step in this phase is to fully define the marketability of proposed technologies in terms of actual market size, pricing and cost factors, competitive risks and/or advantages, and other key factors used to develop marketing and business plans.

Paper Details

Date Published: 30 September 2003
PDF: 15 pages
Proc. SPIE 5083, Unmanned Ground Vehicle Technology V, (30 September 2003); doi: 10.1117/12.497427
Show Author Affiliations
Donny Ciccimaro, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Ctr. (United States)
William Baker, San Diego State Univ. (United States)
Ian Hamilton, San Diego State Univ. (United States)
Leif Heikkila, San Diego State Univ. (United States)
Joel Renick, San Diego State Univ. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 5083:
Unmanned Ground Vehicle Technology V
Grant R. Gerhart; Charles M. Shoemaker; Douglas W. Gage, Editor(s)

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