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Proceedings Paper

Significance of retinal laser lesion location and subretinal hemorrhage in bridging choroidal neovascular complexes
Author(s): Steven T. Schuschereba; Donna R. Clarkson; Lynn M. Valo; Jeremiah Brown; Bruce E. Stuck
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Paper Abstract

Purpose: To determine funduscopic criteria that will help predict when bridging choroidal neovascular (CNV) complexes will develop after laser retinal trauma and to define early preventive treatment targets. Methods: Ten rhesus monkeys were used and retinal lesions were produced by Nd:YAG exposures (20ns, 1-2mJ, 1064nm, min. spot size) simulating human accidental laser trauma to the central fundus. Funduscopy and fluorescein/ICG angiography were conducted at day 1, 4, and 14, and at 2 and 4 months, and animals terminated for histologic evaluation. Predisposition for bridging fibrovascular complexes was evaluated for single lesions, two small lesions showing coalescing hemorrhages, and multiple lesions involved with large field subretinal and vitreous hemorrhages. Results: Elevated CNVs were present in all single lesions with confined subretinal hemorrhages. All lesion sets that showed initial and small coalescing subretinal hemorrhages formed bridging CNV scars. No bridging CNVs occurred in lesion sets involving a vitreous hemorrhage adjacent to a confined, but small subretinal hemorrhage. In large field subretinal hemorrhages involving multiple laser lesions, complex CNV formation occurred. Extensive secondary photoreceptor losses occurred in confined hemorrhage and CNV zones. Conclusion: Trauma presenting with evidence of coalescing and confined subretinal hemorrhages between two adjacent lesions has a high chance of forming choroidal neovascular bridge complexes between the involved lesions. CNV formation may be related to the long residence time, break down products, and clearance processes of extravasated blood. Removal of trapped blood and curtailing angiogenesis and cellular proliferation may be helpful treatment strategies.

Paper Details

Date Published: 20 June 2003
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 4953, Laser and Noncoherent Light Ocular Effects: Epidemiology, Prevention, and Treatment III, (20 June 2003); doi: 10.1117/12.485728
Show Author Affiliations
Steven T. Schuschereba, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (United States)
Donna R. Clarkson, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (United States)
Lynn M. Valo, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (United States)
Jeremiah Brown, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (United States)
Bruce E. Stuck, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4953:
Laser and Noncoherent Light Ocular Effects: Epidemiology, Prevention, and Treatment III
Bruce E. Stuck; Michael Belkin, Editor(s)

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