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Proceedings Paper

Biologically inspired technologies in NASA's morphing project
Author(s): Anna-Maria Rivas McGowan; David E. Cox; Barry S. Lazos; Martin R. Waszak; David L. Raney; Emilie J. Siochi; S. Paul Pao
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Paper Abstract

For centuries, biology has provided fertile ground for hypothesis, discovery, and inspiration. Time-tested methods used in nature are being used as a basis for several research studies conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center as a part of Morphing Project, which develops and assesses breakthrough vehicle technologies. These studies range from low drag airfoil design guided by marine and avian morphologies to soaring techniques inspired by birds and the study of small flexible wing vehicles. Biology often suggests unconventional yet effective approaches such as non-planar wings, dynamic soaring, exploiting aeroelastic effects, collaborative control, flapping, and fibrous active materials. These approaches and other novel technologies for future flight vehicles are being studied in NASA's Morphing Project. This paper will discuss recent findings in the aeronautics-based, biologically-inspired research in the project.

Paper Details

Date Published: 28 July 2003
PDF: 13 pages
Proc. SPIE 5051, Smart Structures and Materials 2003: Electroactive Polymer Actuators and Devices (EAPAD), (28 July 2003); doi: 10.1117/12.484714
Show Author Affiliations
Anna-Maria Rivas McGowan, NASA Langley Research Ctr. (United States)
David E. Cox, NASA Langley Research Ctr. (United States)
Barry S. Lazos, NASA Langley Research Ctr. (United States)
Martin R. Waszak, NASA Langley Research Ctr. (United States)
David L. Raney, NASA Langley Research Ctr. (United States)
Emilie J. Siochi, NASA Langley Research Ctr. (United States)
S. Paul Pao, NASA Langley Research Ctr. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 5051:
Smart Structures and Materials 2003: Electroactive Polymer Actuators and Devices (EAPAD)
Yoseph Bar-Cohen, Editor(s)

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