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Proceedings Paper

Modular removable precision mechanism for alignment of an FUV spatial heterodyne interferometer
Author(s): James L. Tom; Daniel M. Cotton; Brett C. Bush; Raymond Chung; Supriya Chakrabarti
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Paper Abstract

Spaceflight optical instruments have two conflicting requirements. They need to be both rigid and lightweight. In addition, for interferometric far ultraviolet spectrometers, the requirements for precision positioning are more severe than for conventional spectrometers. To meet the challenge of lightweight optical instruments, a modular adjustment mechanism was developed to position two orthogonal axes of a universal three-axis gimbal support system with a positioning accuracy on the order of 10 arc seconds. The mechanism was designed as a self-contained assembly which can be removed after final alignment of a spacebound optical instrument to reduce its in-flight mass. To demonstrate the concept, a number of these assemblies were made and mounted on two of the positioning axes of a far ultraviolet spatial heterodyne interferometer. A shaft clamp was used on each positioning axis to retain the adjusted position. This paper describes the design of the mechanism and presents optical test results.

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 October 1991
PDF: 5 pages
Proc. SPIE 1549, EUV, X-Ray, and Gamma-Ray Instrumentation for Astronomy II, (1 October 1991); doi: 10.1117/12.48349
Show Author Affiliations
James L. Tom, Univ. of California/Berkeley (United States)
Daniel M. Cotton, Univ. of California/Berkeley (United States)
Brett C. Bush, Univ. of California/Berkeley (United States)
Raymond Chung, Univ. of California/Berkeley (United States)
Supriya Chakrabarti, Univ. of California/Berkeley (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 1549:
EUV, X-Ray, and Gamma-Ray Instrumentation for Astronomy II
Oswald H. W. Siegmund; Richard E. Rothschild, Editor(s)

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