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Proceedings Paper

Remote sensing: special operations with unattended ground sensors -- perspectives and challenges
Author(s): Paul F. Morgan
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Paper Abstract

This paper discusses the USSOCOM Special Operations Technology Objectives with regard to Unattended Ground Sensors. It covers capabilities, objectives and challenges. Special operations are conducted by highly trained, organized and equipped military and paramilitary forces to achieve military, political, economic or informational objectives by unconventional military means in hostile, denied, or politically sensitive areas. Political-military considerations frequently shape special operations, requiring clandestine, covert, or low visibility techniques and oversight at the national level. Special Reconnaissance, a core task, for USSOCOM are those surveillance activities conducted by SOF to obtain or verify by visual or other collection methods, information concerning the capabilities, intentions, and activities of enemy forces or to secure data concerning the meteorological, hydrographic, or geographic characteristics of a particular area. It includes target acquisition, area assessment and post-strike reconnaissance. This is a general overview; it does not discuss specific mission requirements or scenarios.

Paper Details

Date Published: 14 August 2002
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 4708, Sensors, and Command, Control, Communications, and Intelligence (C3I) Technologies for Homeland Defense and Law Enforcement, (14 August 2002); doi: 10.1117/12.479316
Show Author Affiliations
Paul F. Morgan, U.S. Special Operations Command (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4708:
Sensors, and Command, Control, Communications, and Intelligence (C3I) Technologies for Homeland Defense and Law Enforcement
Edward M. Carapezza, Editor(s)

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