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Proceedings Paper

MEMS characterization using laser Doppler vibrometry
Author(s): Eric M. Lawrence; Kevin E. Speller; Duli Yu
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Paper Abstract

The use of Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV) technology has been at the forefront of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) research since the early 1990’s. By its nature as a sensitive laser optical technique, it is well suited for non-contact dynamic response measurements of microscopic structures. The art of the technology has culminated into the latest micro-scanning vibrometer for automated scan measurement and display of deflection shapes with sub-nanometer resolution. To exemplify the use of this technology, Polytec PI presents characterization measurements in collaboration with Applied MEMS on two of their devices used in commercial applications. LDV characterization measurements are used for validating the design of the Applied MEMS two-axis micro mirror. Scan measurements reveal distinct, isolated rotation modes about x- and y- axes that can be used to promote the mirror motion in either direction. Settling time performance is evaluated from impulse response and optimized using Input Shaping techniques. Scan measurements of a low-noise accelerometer device from Applied MEMS reveals spurious high frequency modes of support spring causing unwanted response effects. Further use of a new time domain animation feature shows ringing response of the accelerometer to step motions.

Paper Details

Date Published: 16 January 2003
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 4980, Reliability, Testing, and Characterization of MEMS/MOEMS II, (16 January 2003); doi: 10.1117/12.478195
Show Author Affiliations
Eric M. Lawrence, Polytec PI, Inc. (United States)
Kevin E. Speller, Applied MEMS, Inc. (United States)
Duli Yu, Applied MEMS, Inc. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4980:
Reliability, Testing, and Characterization of MEMS/MOEMS II
Rajeshuni Ramesham; Danelle M. Tanner, Editor(s)

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