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Proceedings Paper

Influence of fiber optic probe geometry on the origin of detected fluorescence: experimental validation of computational results
Author(s): T. Joshua Pfefer; L. Stephanie Matchette; Amanda M. Ross; Marwood N. Ediger
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Paper Abstract

Prior computational investigations indicate that the origin of signals detected during fluorescence spectroscopy is highly dependent on illumination-collection geometry. The present study was undertaken to provide experimental validation of trends noted in these prior studies. Two-layered tissue phantoms were constructed using agarose gels doped with Intralipid and either Fluorescein or Rhodamine to achieve biologically relevant levels of scattering and easily measurable levels of fluorescence. The effect of fiber diameter, fiber-sample spacing, and fiber-fiber spacing were investigated using single and multi-fiber probes. Increases in diameter and fiber-sample spacing for single fiber probes resulted in improved detection of the deeper fluorophore layer, as did an increase in illumination-collection fiber spacing in multi-fiber probes. As multi-fiber probe-sample spacing was increased, an increase in relative contribution from the superficial layer, followed by a subsequent reversal of this trend, was measured. Each of these results is in qualitative agreement with prior simulations, thus providing further evidence of the utility of numerical modeling as a tool for elucidating light-tissue interactions and device design. Furthermore, the trends noted here have the potential to form the basis of systems which determine the distribution of tissue fluorophores and/or target specific tissue layers, thus leading to improvements in the efficacy of optical diagnostics.

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 July 2003
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 4957, Optical Fibers and Sensors for Medical Applications III, (1 July 2003); doi: 10.1117/12.478055
Show Author Affiliations
T. Joshua Pfefer, Ctr. for Devices and Radiological Health/U.S. Food and Drug Administration (United States)
L. Stephanie Matchette, Ctr. for Devices and Radiological Health/U.S. Food and Drug Administration (United States)
Amanda M. Ross, Marquette Univ. (United States)
Marwood N. Ediger, Ctr. for Devices and Radiological Health/U.S. Food and Drug Administration (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4957:
Optical Fibers and Sensors for Medical Applications III
Israel Gannot, Editor(s)

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