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Proceedings Paper

Ureteroscopy and holmium:YAG laser lithotripsy: an emerging definitive management strategy for symptomatic ureteral calculi in pregnancy
Author(s): James D. Watterson; Andrew R. Girvan; Darren T. Beiko; Linda Nott; Timothy A. Wollin; Hassan A. Razvi; John D. Denstedt
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Paper Abstract

Objectives: Symptomatic urolithiasis in pregnancy that does not respond to conservative measures has traditionally been managed with ureteral stent insertion or percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN). Holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (YAG) laser lithotripsy using state-of-the-art ureteroscopes represents an emerging strategy for definitive stone management in pregnancy. The purpose of this study was to review the results of holmium laser lithotripsy in a cohort of patients who presented with symptomatic urolithiasis in pregnancy. Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted at 2 tertiary stone centers from January 1996 to August 2001 to identify pregnant patients who were treated with ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy for symptomatic urolithiasis or encrusted stents. Eight patients with a total of 10 symptomatic ureteral calculi and 2 encrusted ureteral stents were treated. Mean gestational age at presentation was 22 weeks. Mean stone size was 8.1 mm. Stones were located in the proximal ureter/ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) (3), mid ureter (1), and distal ureter (6). Results: Complete stone fragmentation and/or removal of encrusted ureteral stents were achieved in all patients using the holmium:YAG laser. The overall procedural success rate was 91%. The overall stone-free rate was 89%. No obstetrical or urological complications were encountered. Conclusions: Ureteroscopy and holmium laser lithotripsy can be performed safely in all stages of pregnancy providing definitive management of symptomatic ureteral calculi. The procedure can be done with minimal or no fluoroscopy and avoids the undesirable features of stents or nephrostomy tubes.

Paper Details

Date Published: 12 September 2003
PDF: 13 pages
Proc. SPIE 4949, Lasers in Surgery: Advanced Characterization, Therapeutics, and Systems XIII, (12 September 2003); doi: 10.1117/12.476154
Show Author Affiliations
James D. Watterson, Univ. of Western Ontario (Canada)
Andrew R. Girvan, Univ. of Western Ontario (Canada)
Darren T. Beiko, Univ. of Western Ontario (Canada)
Linda Nott, Univ. of Western Ontario (Canada)
Timothy A. Wollin, Univ. of Alberta (Canada)
Hassan A. Razvi, Univ. of Western Ontario (Canada)
John D. Denstedt, Univ. of Western Ontario (Canada)

Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4949:
Lasers in Surgery: Advanced Characterization, Therapeutics, and Systems XIII
Eugene A. Trowers; Timothy A. Woodward; Werner T.W. de Riese; Lawrence S. Bass; Nikiforos Kollias; Udayan K. Shah; Brian Jet-Fei Wong; Reza S. Malek; David S. Robinson; Hans-Dieter Reidenbach; Keith D. Paulsen; Kenton W. Gregory; Lawrence S. Bass; Abraham Katzir, Editor(s)

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