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Proceedings Paper

Guardian: a router mechanism for extreme overload prevention
Author(s): Hao Jiang; Constantinos Dovrolis
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Paper Abstract

Disasters such as the 9/11 attacks, as well as major and unpredictable events, can cause extreme network overload. By "extreme overload" we mean, first, that the offered load at a link is significantly higher than the link's capacity, and second, that the average throughput per session is too low. Under such conditions, the network can suffer from a form of "livelock" in which even though links are fully utilized, most users cannot complete their transfers. The underlying reasons are that the network carries many retransmitted packets, and that it services flows that are finally aborted by users or applications. To prevent extreme network overload, we propose a router mechanism called Guardian. Guardian is a form of admission control module that is automatically activated when it detects the onset of extreme overload at a network link. Guardian's objective is to allow at least some sessions to complete, rejecting new TCP or UDP sessions that would probably not manage to acquire a minimum acceptable throughput. Guardian does not require signalling, and it can be implemented using standard techniques for session counting and caching. This paper describes on-going work. As such, we focus on the motivation for the proposed mechanism, and on Guardian's main design.

Paper Details

Date Published: 8 July 2002
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 4868, Scalability and Traffic Control in IP Networks II, (8 July 2002); doi: 10.1117/12.475278
Show Author Affiliations
Hao Jiang, Univ. of Delaware (United States)
Constantinos Dovrolis, Univ. of Delaware (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4868:
Scalability and Traffic Control in IP Networks II
Victor Firoiu; Zhi-Li Zhang, Editor(s)

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