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Proceedings Paper

Implementation of a personal-computer-based real-time hardware-in-the-loop U.S. Army aviation and missile command simulator
Author(s): David L. Beck; Robert G. Bennett
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Paper Abstract

With the rapid increase in computational power of the standard personal computer, many tasks that could only be performed by a mini-computer or mainframe can now be performed by the common personal computer. Ten years ago, computational and data transfer requirements for a real-time hardware-in-the-loop simulator could only be met by specialized high performance mini-computers. Today, personal computers shoulder the bulk of the computational load in the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command's Radio Frequency Simulation System, and one of the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command's millimeter wave simulation systems is currently undergoing a transition to personal computers. This paper discusses how personal computers have been used as the computational backbone for a real-time hardware-in-the-loop simulator, and some of the advantages and disadvantages of a PC based simulation. This paper also provides some general background on what the Radio Frequency Simulation System (RFSS) is and how it works, since the RFSS has successfully implemented a PC based real-time hardware-in-the-loop simulator.

Paper Details

Date Published: 12 July 2002
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 4717, Technologies for Synthetic Environments: Hardware-in-the-Loop Testing VII, (12 July 2002); doi: 10.1117/12.474724
Show Author Affiliations
David L. Beck, U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command (United States)
Robert G. Bennett, U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4717:
Technologies for Synthetic Environments: Hardware-in-the-Loop Testing VII
Robert Lee Murrer, Editor(s)

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