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Proceedings Paper

Maximizing common process latitude by integrated process development for 130-nm lithography
Author(s): Michael T. Reilly; Colin R. Parker; Frank W. Fischer; Todd Hiar
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Paper Abstract

Maximized inherent common process latitude of 130 nm line/space features through pitch is demonstrated in this work. It is shown that the principle method for doing so is by reducing the through pitch, or proximity, bias. The effects that formulation, illumination optics and mask error have on proximity bias are studied. Formulations exhibit a wide range of bias that does not necessarily depend upon activation energy or process temperatures. Optical settings for inner and outer sigma for both annular and quadrupole illumination, likewise, have a demonstrable effect on the proximity bias. Larger, tighter annuli or poles produce larger bias, while lower settings incur a loss of resolution. Either effect limits the common latitude so a balance is struck between them. Additionally, while the effect of outer sigma is obvious in the data, the inner sigma effect is not observed until data are corrected for mask error and the mask error factor. The proximity bias ranges between approximately 10 and 80 nm, depending upon the combination of conditions. Sub-resolution assist features (scattering bars) are specifically excluded from use in this experiment.

Paper Details

Date Published: 30 July 2002
PDF: 11 pages
Proc. SPIE 4691, Optical Microlithography XV, (30 July 2002); doi: 10.1117/12.474626
Show Author Affiliations
Michael T. Reilly, Shipley Co. L.L.C. (United States)
Colin R. Parker, Shipley Co. L.L.C. (United States)
Frank W. Fischer, Shipley Co. L.L.C. (United States)
Todd Hiar, ASML (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4691:
Optical Microlithography XV
Anthony Yen, Editor(s)

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