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Proceedings Paper

Observation under the gradually increasing cyclic loading of yielding region of the circular hole vicinity
Author(s): Kensuke Ichinose; Yuji Funamoto; Kenji Gomi; Kiyoshi Taniuchi; Katsumi Fukuda
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Paper Abstract

Under the cyclic loading, stress concentration takes place in the member with circular hole, and it affected to fatigue fracture. Therefore, it is important to obtain the information on the stress concentration of circular hole in the study of fatigue fracture. In the carbon steel strip, it is well known under static loading that Luders' lines which arose by yield stress in the member surface and observed easily by naked eyes exists. The same phenomenon takes place by application of cyclic loading at load ratio: R=0. The direct observation using Luders' lines becomes visible smart sensor that discerns the yielding region. This method is using the property of material itself, and it is a simple method. And, the continuous change of the member surface can discern real-time. The purpose of this study is to obtain basic data on the stress concentation of the vicinity of circular hole by observing the continuous change of the specimen surface in R=0, -1, using the carbon steel strip with a circular hole. And, the stress concentration factor required by FEM analysis and experiment was compared, when yield criterion was changed.

Paper Details

Date Published: 13 November 2002
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 4934, Smart Materials II, (13 November 2002); doi: 10.1117/12.469183
Show Author Affiliations
Kensuke Ichinose, Tokyo Denki Univ. (Japan)
Yuji Funamoto, Tokyo Denki Univ. (Japan)
Kenji Gomi, Tokyo Denki Univ. (Japan)
Kiyoshi Taniuchi, Meiji Univ. (Japan)
Katsumi Fukuda, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4934:
Smart Materials II
Alan R. Wilson, Editor(s)

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