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Proceedings Paper

Coherent transients generated at molecular levels dressed by electromagnetic field
Author(s): Natalia N. Rubtsova; T. P. Konstantinova
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Paper Abstract

Free polarization decay and photon echo were studied experimentally in polar gas 13CH3F at the transition R(4,3) of vibrational mode 0 yields 1 (nu) 3 by Stark switching of molecular levels under irradiation by CW CO2 laser at 9P(32) line. Application of 4.5 mcs pulse to the Stark electrodes inside the gas cell allows to detect the free polarization decay signal, combined with the optical nutation. The sign of the signal corresponds to the increase of absorption in the limit of low intensity (not over 0.01 W/cm2) saturating radiation. Exciting intensity growth till the level of 6.0 W/cm2 implies decrease of signal absolute value, till the change of its sign, while the oscillation of the free polarization decay signal reveals remarkable frequency shift. Such behavior is attributed to the combined action of the dynamic Stark effect of CW radiation field and the levels splitting by the Stark voltage. Two shorter (of about 0.1 and 0.2 mcs) Stark pulses, applied to the gas, generate the photon echo signals detected by the same heterodyne technique. The study of the variations of photon echo parameters versus exciting radiation intensity is in progress.

Paper Details

Date Published: 29 May 2002
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 4748, ICONO 2001: Fundamental Aspects of Laser-Matter Interaction and Physics of Nanostructures, (29 May 2002); doi: 10.1117/12.468933
Show Author Affiliations
Natalia N. Rubtsova, Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Russia)
T. P. Konstantinova, Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Russia)

Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4748:
ICONO 2001: Fundamental Aspects of Laser-Matter Interaction and Physics of Nanostructures

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