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Proceedings Paper

PACS according to Murphy: what can and will go wrong
Author(s): Janice C. Honeyman-Buck; Manuel Arreola; Meryll M. Frost
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Paper Abstract

A multi-institutional PACS and electronic radiology practice is in daily operation based at the University of Florida. This system is evolving constantly as technology advances and users become more sophisticated. As the technology advances, however, more things can and do go wrong. The PACS quality control and working groups at the University have compile the problems that have been encountered is this rapidly changing environment and have designed tools or procedures to either eliminate the problems or to minimize their impact on the operation of the system. As a result, a series of automated tools have been created to correct mislabeled images, to monitor the correct operation of the system, and to inform support of problems as soon as they are discovered. In the case where automated tools cannot solve the problem, protocols have been designed and procedures developed to identify issues and resolve them before time is wasted or the system fails. Not every problem can be anticipated and solved prior to it occurring, but this work can help alert new users and perhaps even experienced users to unanticipated disasters with PACS and other technologies associated with an electronic radiology practice.

Paper Details

Date Published: 16 May 2002
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 4685, Medical Imaging 2002: PACS and Integrated Medical Information Systems: Design and Evaluation, (16 May 2002); doi: 10.1117/12.466998
Show Author Affiliations
Janice C. Honeyman-Buck, Univ. of Florida (United States)
Manuel Arreola, Univ. of Florida (United States)
Meryll M. Frost, Medical Imaging Consultants, Inc. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4685:
Medical Imaging 2002: PACS and Integrated Medical Information Systems: Design and Evaluation
Eliot L. Siegel; H. K. Huang, Editor(s)

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