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Proceedings Paper

Application research on the investigation and evaluation of the groundwater resource potentials in the test area of north China using remote sensing techniques
Author(s): Yanxiao Qiao
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Paper Abstract

North China Plain covers an area of 140,000km2. Because of groundwater overdraft for many years, the level is rapidly fallen, shallow water-bearing bed seriously drained, and deep one appears many large-scale drawdown cones. The shortage of groundwater resources cause a tense situation in urban, industry and agriculture water-supply. Under the situation, it is a urgent to us to investigate and evaluate the groundwater useful Potentials. The north part of Taihang Mountain front plain is chosen as a test region using remote sensing technique. Landsat-7TM image and aerial colour infrared image are used in the work. Through a comprehensive analysis and study of satellite and aerial images and other related data, the following results are obtained. (1)The alluvial and flood deposit fans are exactly delimitated. (2)The spacial overlapping relations between different fans are defined.(3)Palaeochannels are interpreted in detail. (4)Ten shallow-buried areas of groundwater and one groundwater discharge are discovered. (5)All surface sediment types and all kinds of microgeomorphic bodies are interpreted. (6)6 rich groundwater areas are definited, and two of all are confirmed by a geological examination.

Paper Details

Date Published: 14 July 2003
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 4890, Ecosystems Dynamics, Ecosystem-Society Interactions, and Remote Sensing Applications for Semi-Arid and Arid Land, (14 July 2003); doi: 10.1117/12.465996
Show Author Affiliations
Yanxiao Qiao, Remote Sensing Ctr. of Hebei Province (China)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4890:
Ecosystems Dynamics, Ecosystem-Society Interactions, and Remote Sensing Applications for Semi-Arid and Arid Land
Xiaoling Pan; Wei Gao; Michael H. Glantz; Yoshiaki Honda, Editor(s)

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