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Proceedings Paper

Mechanism of laser immunotherapy: role of immunoadjuvant and selective photothermal laser-tissue interaction
Author(s): Wei R. Chen; Hong Liu; Robert E. Nordquist
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Paper Abstract

Immunotherapy has been used for cancer treatment in the past century. Although different approaches have been attempted, the basic strategy has been targeting specific tumor antigens to induce host immune responses. Laser immunotherapy is a novel approach in treating metastatic tumors. The combination of two major interactions in laser immunotherapy - selective photothermal and photoimmunological interactions - is designed to induce a tumor-specific host immune response. The hypothetical mechanism is as follows. The intratumor injection of laser- absorbing dye and the noninvasive irradiation of a near- infrared laser produce an acute, selective thermal tumor killing, and at the same time, release tumor antigens. The in-situ immunoadjuvant then combines with the liberated tumor antigens to stimulate and direct the host immune system to fight against remaining tumor cells both locally and in remote metastatic sites. In effect, an in-situ vaccination against the tumor was achieved. Such an immune response eventually leads to a systemic, long-term tumor resistance. Our pre-clinical animal studies have demonstrated such a long-term immunity. Specifically, a novel immunoadjuvant, glycated chitosan (GC), was used in laser immunotherapy. Because the use of immunoadjuvant is crucial in cancer immunotherapy, the role of GC was investigated.

Paper Details

Date Published: 12 April 2002
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 4536, International Workshop on Photonics and Imaging in Biology and Medicine, (12 April 2002); doi: 10.1117/12.462529
Show Author Affiliations
Wei R. Chen, Univ. of Central Oklahoma and Univ. of Oklahoma (United States)
Hong Liu, Univ. of Oklahoma (United States)
Robert E. Nordquist, Wound Healing of Oklahoma, Inc. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4536:
International Workshop on Photonics and Imaging in Biology and Medicine

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