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Proceedings Paper

The Fiber Multi-Object Spectrograph (FMOS) project: the Anglo-Australian Observatory role
Author(s): Peter R. Gillingham; Anna Marie Moore; Masayuki Akiyama; Jurek Brzeski; David Correll; John Dawson; Tony J. Farrell; Gabriella Frost; Jason S. Griesbach; Roger Haynes; Damien Jones; Stan Miziarski; Rolf Muller; Scott Smedley; Greg Smith; Lew G. Waller; Katie Noakes; Chris Arridge
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Paper Abstract

The Fiber Multi-Object Spectrograph (FMOS) project is an Australia-Japan-UK collaboration to design and build a novel 400 fiber positioner feeding two near infrared spectrographs from the prime focus of the Subaru telescope. The project comprises several parts. Those under design and construction at the Anglo-Australian Observatory (AAO) are the piezoelectric actuator driven fiber positioner (Echidna), a wide field (30 arcmin) corrector and a focal plane imager (FPI) used for controlling the positioner and for field acquisition. This paper presents an overview of the AAO share of the FMOS project. It describes the technical infrastructure required to extend the single Echidna "spine" design to a fully functioning multi-fiber instrument, capable of complete field reconfiguration in less than ten minutes. The modular Echidna system is introduced, wherein the field of view is populated by 12 identical rectangular modules, each positioning 40 science fibers and 2 guide fiber bundles. This arrangement allows maintenance by exchanging modules and minimizes the difficulties of construction. The associated electronics hardware, in itself a significant challenge, includes a 23 layer PCB board, able to supply current to each piezoelectric element in the module. The FPI is a dual purpose imaging system translating in two coordinates and is located beneath the assembled modules. The FPI measures the spine positions as well as acquiring sky images for instrument calibration and for field acquisition. An overview of the software is included.

Paper Details

Date Published: 7 March 2003
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 4841, Instrument Design and Performance for Optical/Infrared Ground-based Telescopes, (7 March 2003); doi: 10.1117/12.462002
Show Author Affiliations
Peter R. Gillingham, Anglo-Australian Observatory (United States)
Anna Marie Moore, Anglo-Australian Observatory (Australia)
Masayuki Akiyama, Subaru Telescope/NAOJ (United States)
Jurek Brzeski, Anglo-Australian Observatory (Australia)
David Correll, Anglo-Australian Observatory (Australia)
John Dawson, Anglo-Australian Observatory (Australia)
Tony J. Farrell, Anglo-Australian Observatory (Australia)
Gabriella Frost, Anglo-Australian Observatory (Australia)
Jason S. Griesbach, Anglo-Australian Observatory (Australia)
Roger Haynes, Anglo-Australian Observatory (Australia)
Damien Jones, Prime Optics (Australia)
Stan Miziarski, Anglo-Australian Observatory (Australia)
Rolf Muller, Anglo-Australian Observatory (Australia)
Scott Smedley, Anglo-Australian Observatory (Australia)
Greg Smith, Anglo-Australian Observatory (Australia)
Lew G. Waller, Anglo-Australian Observatory (Australia)
Katie Noakes, Anglo-Australian Observatory (Australia)
Chris Arridge, Anglo-Australian Observatory (Australia)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4841:
Instrument Design and Performance for Optical/Infrared Ground-based Telescopes
Masanori Iye; Alan F. M. Moorwood, Editor(s)

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