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Proceedings Paper

Hubble Space Telescope on-line telemetry archive for monitoring science instruments
Author(s): Manfred P. Miebach
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Paper Abstract

A major milestone in an effort to update the aging Hubble Space Telescope (HST) ground system was completed when HST operations were switched to a new ground system, a project called "Vision 2000 Control Center System CCS)", at the time of the third Servicing Mission in December 1999. A major CCS subsystem is the Space Telescope Engineering Data Store, the design of which is based on modern Data Warehousing technology. In fact, the Data Warehouse (DW) as implemented in the CCS Ground System that operates and monitors the Hubble Space Telescope represents, the first use of a commercial Data Warehouse to manage engineering data. By the end of February 2002, the process of populating the Data Warehouse with HST historical telemetry data had been completed, providing access to HST engineering data for a period of over 12 years with a current data volume of 2.8 Terabytes. This paper describes hands-on experience from an end user perspective, using the CCS system capabilities, including the Data Warehouse as an HST engineering telemetry archive. The Engineering Team at the Space Telescope Science Institute is using HST telemetry extensively for monitoring the Scientific Instruments, in particular for · Spacecraft anomaly resolutions · Scientific Instrument trending · Improvements of Instrument operational efficiency The overall idea is to maximize science output of the space observatory. Furthermore, the CCS provides a powerful feature to build, save, and recall real-time display pages customized to specific subsystems and operational scenarios. Engineering teams are using the real-time monitoring capabilities intensively during Servicing Missions and real time commanding to handle anomaly situations, while the Flight Operations Team (FOT) monitors the spacecraft around the clock.

Paper Details

Date Published: 2 January 2002
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 4844, Observatory Operations to Optimize Scientific Return III, (2 January 2002); doi: 10.1117/12.460637
Show Author Affiliations
Manfred P. Miebach, European Space Agency/Space Telescope Science Institute (United States)

Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4844:
Observatory Operations to Optimize Scientific Return III
Peter J. Quinn, Editor(s)

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