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Proceedings Paper

Performance results of the GALEX cross delay line detectors
Author(s): Patrick N. Jelinsky; Patrick F. Morrissey; James M. Malloy; Sharon R. Jelinsky; Oswald H. W. Siegmund; Christopher Martin; David Schiminovich; Karl Forster; Ted Wyder; Peter G. Friedman
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Paper Abstract

We describe the performance results for the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) far ultraviolet (FUV) and near ultraviolet (NUV) detectors. The detectors were delivered to JPL/Caltech starting in the fall of 2000 and have undergone approximately 1000 hours of pre-flight system-level testing to date. The GALEX detectors are sealed tube micro-channel plate (MCP) delay line readout detectors. They have a 65 mm diameter active area, which will be the largest format on orbit. The FUV detector has a spectral bandpass from 115 - 180 nm and the NUV detector has a bandpass from 165 - 300 nm. We report here on the performance of the detectors before and after integration into the instrument. Characteristics measured include the background count rate and distribution, gain vs. applied high voltage, spatial resolution and linearity, flat fields, and quantum efficiency.

Paper Details

Date Published: 24 February 2003
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 4854, Future EUV/UV and Visible Space Astrophysics Missions and Instrumentation, (24 February 2003); doi: 10.1117/12.460013
Show Author Affiliations
Patrick N. Jelinsky, Space Sciences Lab., Univ. of California/Berkeley (United States)
Patrick F. Morrissey, Space Astrophysics Lab., California Institute of Technology (United States)
James M. Malloy, Space Sciences Lab., Univ. of California/Berkeley (United States)
Sharon R. Jelinsky, Space Sciences Lab., Univ. of California/Berkeley (United States)
Oswald H. W. Siegmund, Space Sciences Lab., Univ. of California/Berkeley (United States)
Christopher Martin, Space Astrophysics Lab., California Institute of Technology (United States)
David Schiminovich, Space Astrophysics Lab., California Institute of Technology (United States)
Karl Forster, Space Astrophysics Lab., California Institute of Technology (United States)
Ted Wyder, Space Astrophysics Lab., California Institute of Technology (United States)
Peter G. Friedman, Space Astrophysics Lab., California Institute of Technology (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4854:
Future EUV/UV and Visible Space Astrophysics Missions and Instrumentation
J. Chris Blades; Oswald H. W. Siegmund, Editor(s)

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