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Proceedings Paper

A novel process to fabricate mirrors with a very long radius and ultra-smooth surfaces
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Paper Abstract

During the course of performing space flight qualification testing of composite mirrors at NASA GSFC, a serendipitious event was observed which, in retrospect, should have been obvious. Investigation of this phenomenon leads to a promising avenue towards the fabrication of large aperture precision spherical mirrors with very long radius of curvature (>f/100). Such mirrors are required for future missions such as the Stellar Imager. We report on the observation and analysis of the event, optical measurements, and the development of associated active figure control systems.

Paper Details

Date Published: 24 February 2003
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 4854, Future EUV/UV and Visible Space Astrophysics Missions and Instrumentation, (24 February 2003); doi: 10.1117/12.459949
Show Author Affiliations
Peter C. Chen, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Composite Mirror Applications, Inc. (United States)
Kenneth G. Carpenter, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Robert C. Romeo, Composite Mirror Applications, Inc. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4854:
Future EUV/UV and Visible Space Astrophysics Missions and Instrumentation
J. Chris Blades; Oswald H. W. Siegmund, Editor(s)

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