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Proceedings Paper

SCUBA-2: developing the detectors
Author(s): William Duncan; Wayne S. Holland; Michael Damian Audley; M. Cliffe; T. Hodson; B. D. Kelly; Xiaofeng Gao; David C. Gostick; M. MacIntosh; Helen McGregor; Tully Peacocke; Kent D. Irwin; Gene C. Hilton; Steven W. Deiker; J. Beier; Carl D. Reintsema; Anthony J. Walton; W. Parkes; Tom Stevenson; Alan M. Gundlach; Camelia Dunare; Peter A. R. Ade
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Paper Abstract

SCUBA-2 is a second generation, wide-field submillimeter camera under development for the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. With over 12,000 pixels, in two arrays, SCUBA-2 will map the submillimeter sky ~1000 times faster than the current SCUBA instrument to the same signal-to-noise. Many areas of astronomy will benefit from such a highly sensitive survey instrument: from studies of galaxy formation and evolution in the early Universe to understanding star and planet formation in our own Galaxy. Due to be operational in 2006, SCUBA-2 will also act as a "pathfinder" for the new generation of submillimeter interferometers (such as ALMA) by performing large-area surveys to an unprecedented depth. The challenge of developing the detectors and multiplexer is discussed in this paper.

Paper Details

Date Published: 17 February 2003
PDF: 11 pages
Proc. SPIE 4855, Millimeter and Submillimeter Detectors for Astronomy, (17 February 2003); doi: 10.1117/12.459107
Show Author Affiliations
William Duncan, UK Astronomy Technology Ctr./Royal Observatory Edinburgh (United Kingdom)
Wayne S. Holland, UK Astronomy Technology Ctr./Royal Observatory Edinburgh (United Kingdom)
Michael Damian Audley, UK Astronomy Technology Ctr./Royal Observatory Edinburgh (United Kingdom)
M. Cliffe, UK Astronomy Technology Ctr./Royal Observatory Edinburgh (United Kingdom)
T. Hodson, UK Astronomy Technology Ctr./Royal Observatory Edinburgh (United Kingdom)
B. D. Kelly, UK Astronomy Technology Ctr./Royal Observatory Edinburgh (United Kingdom)
Xiaofeng Gao, UK Astronomy Technology Ctr./Royal Observatory Edinburgh (United Kingdom)
David C. Gostick, UK Astronomy Technology Ctr./Royal Observatory Edinburgh (United Kingdom)
M. MacIntosh, UK Astronomy Technology Ctr./Royal Observatory Edinburgh (United Kingdom)
Helen McGregor, UK Astronomy Technology Ctr./Royal Observatory Edinburgh (United Kingdom)
Tully Peacocke, UK Astronomy Technology Ctr./Royal Observatory Edinburgh (United Kingdom)
Kent D. Irwin, National Institute of Standards and Technology (United States)
Gene C. Hilton, National Institute of Standards and Technology (United States)
Steven W. Deiker, National Institute of Standards and Technology (United States)
J. Beier, National Institute for Standards and Technology (United States)
Carl D. Reintsema, National Institute of Standards and Technology (United States)
Anthony J. Walton, Univ. of Edinburgh (United Kingdom)
W. Parkes, Univ. of Edinburgh (United Kingdom)
Tom Stevenson, Univ. of Edinburgh (United Kingdom)
Alan M. Gundlach, Univ. of Edinburgh (United Kingdom)
Camelia Dunare, Univ. of Edinburgh (United Kingdom)
Peter A. R. Ade, Univ. of Wales/Cardiff (United Kingdom)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4855:
Millimeter and Submillimeter Detectors for Astronomy
Thomas G. Phillips; Jonas Zmuidzinas, Editor(s)

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