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Proceedings Paper

Relation of thunderstorm activity to cosmic ray variations
Author(s): V. A. Mullayarov; V. I. Kozlov; R. R. Karimov
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Paper Abstract

Thunderstorm activity variations relative to the onset of > 10 MeV proton flow rise and in the periods of galactic cosmic ray decreases (Forbush-effects) are studied by the superposed epoch technique. Thunderstorm activity is estimated by VLF-noise level registered in Yakutsk. In summer day and winter night hours the decrease of the VLF- noise level up to minimum is observed on the third day after the proton burst and then the increase - on the forth-fifth day. With respect to the onset of Forbush-decreases one can distinguish two phases of the effect: during the first phase the decrease of the VLF-noise amplitude occurs on the 0, -1 day, and during the second one the increase takes place on the +1, 2 day with the excess of the initial undisturbed level. The obtained results allow to connect the considered reasons and to imagine the thunderstorm activity variations in common sequence. The simultaneous consideration of effects shows that the decrease of the VLF- noise level is caused by the burst of protons and the increase of the noise level during subsequent days is caused by GCR Forbush-decreases.

Paper Details

Date Published: 28 February 2002
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 4678, Eighth International Symposium on Atmospheric and Ocean Optics: Atmospheric Physics, (28 February 2002); doi: 10.1117/12.458516
Show Author Affiliations
V. A. Mullayarov, Institute of Cosmophysical Research and Aeronomy (Russia)
V. I. Kozlov, Institute of Cosmophysical Research and Aeronomy (Russia)
R. R. Karimov, Institute of Cosmophysical Research and Aeronomy (Russia)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4678:
Eighth International Symposium on Atmospheric and Ocean Optics: Atmospheric Physics

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