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Proceedings Paper

Dayside magnetopause erosion on geostationary orbit using WIND and GOES data (1996-1999)
Author(s): Stefan Muehlbachler; Charles J. Farrugia; Helfried K. Biernat; Vladimir S. Semenov; Nikolai V. Erkaev; Roy B. Torbert; Dieter F. Vogl; Daniel Langmayr
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Paper Abstract

During periods of southward interplanetary field and basically constant dynamic pressure, the magnetopause can move earthward due to the so-called phenomenon of magnetopause erosion. In this study, we present several erosion events monitored at geostationary orbit by the GOES spacecrafts underlying WIND measurements in the solar wind. We selected a number of events using 4 years of WIND observations (1996-1999). Specific selection criteria are based on obtaining a progressively decreasing IMF Bz negative, to have various levels of erosion, with and without dynamic pressure changes and of different durations in time. To figure out the erosion effect on geostationary orbit, we have to compare the measured depression in the geostationary magnetic field strength with the magnetic field strength on the well known May 11, 1999, the day the solar wind almost disappeared.

Paper Details

Date Published: 28 February 2002
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 4678, Eighth International Symposium on Atmospheric and Ocean Optics: Atmospheric Physics, (28 February 2002); doi: 10.1117/12.458485
Show Author Affiliations
Stefan Muehlbachler, Space Research Institute (Austria)
Univ. of Graz (Austria)
Charles J. Farrugia, Univ. of New Hampshire (United States)
Helfried K. Biernat, Space Research Institute (Austria)
Univ. of Graz (Austria)
Vladimir S. Semenov, Univ. of St. Petersburg (Russia)
Nikolai V. Erkaev, Institute of Computational Modeling (Russia)
Roy B. Torbert, Univ. of New Hampshire (United States)
Dieter F. Vogl, Space Research Institute (Austria)
Daniel Langmayr, Space Research Institute (Austria)
Univ. of Graz (Austria)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4678:
Eighth International Symposium on Atmospheric and Ocean Optics: Atmospheric Physics

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