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Proceedings Paper

Keck near-infrared observations of the Orion proplyds: initial results
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Paper Abstract

The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has produced dramatic images of proto-planetary disks (“proplyds”) surrounding your (<106 year old) stars embedded in the Orion Nebula. The intense UV radiation field of the high-mass Trapezium stars heats the disk surfaces, drives mass-loss, and produces bright ionization fronts. Many disks are seen in silhouette against the nebular background of the Orion Nebula, or against the proplyd’s own ionization front. The sub-arcsecond resolution and light gathering power of the Keck telescopes in the near-IR provide a unique opportunity to study the earliest phases of planetary disk evolution and disk destruction under intense UV radiation fields. We present initial results from observations of a handful of proplyds using KCAM and NIRSPEC, with and without the adaptive optics (AO) system, on Keck II. These data clearly resolve, both spatially and spectrally, ionization fronts, disks, and a microjet. The data are used to constrain mass-loss rates due to photoevaporation, disk surface wind velocity, and grain size distribution.

Paper Details

Date Published: 13 February 2003
PDF: 11 pages
Proc. SPIE 4834, Discoveries and Research Prospects from 6- to 10-Meter-Class Telescopes II, (13 February 2003); doi: 10.1117/12.457717
Show Author Affiliations
Ralph Y. Shuping, Univ. of California/Los Angeles (United States)
Jennifer Patience, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
John Bally, Univ. of Colorado/Boulder (United States)
Mark Morris, Univ. of California/Los Angeles (United States)
James E. Larkin, Univ. of California/Los Angeles (United States)
Bruce A. Macintosh, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4834:
Discoveries and Research Prospects from 6- to 10-Meter-Class Telescopes II
Puragra Guhathakurta, Editor(s)

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